Robert Krulwich

Robert Krulwich works on radio, podcasts, video, the blogosphere. He has been called "the most inventive network reporter in television" by TV Guide.

Krulwich is a Science Correspondent for NPR. His NPR blog, "Krulwich Wonders" features drawings, cartoons and videos that illustrate hard-to-see concepts in science.

He is the co-host of Radiolab, a nationally distributed radio/podcast series that explores new developments in science for people who are curious but not usually drawn to science shows. "There's nothing like it on the radio," says Ira Glass of This American Life, "It's a act of crazy genius." Radiolab won a Peabody Award in 2011.

His specialty is explaining complex subjects, science, technology, economics, in a style that is clear, compelling and entertaining. On television he has explored the structure of DNA using a banana; on radio he created an Italian opera, "Ratto Interesso" to explain how the Federal Reserve regulates interest rates; he has pioneered the use of new animation on ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight.

For 22 years, Krulwich was a science, economics, general assignment and foreign correspondent at ABC and CBS News.

He won Emmy awards for a cultural history of the Barbie doll, for a Frontline investigation of computers and privacy, a George Polk and Emmy for a look at the Savings & Loan bailout online advertising and the 2010 Essay Prize from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Krulwich earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Oberlin College and a law degree from Columbia University.

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10:34am

Wed April 16, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

The Ultimate Animal Experience? Losing A Memory Quiz To A Chimp

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 12:34 pm

Time to be embarrassed. You're about to be bested by a young chimpanzee in a memory test.

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4:39am

Sat April 5, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

The Power Of Poop: A Whale Story

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 12:46 pm

Robert Krulwich NPR

This, I would think, should be self-evident: Generally speaking, big creatures eat smaller creatures that, in turn, eat even smaller creatures, like this ...

And just as obviously, one would expect the food chain to be pyramid-shaped: a few big creatures at the top eating more middle-sized creatures in the middle, that eat many, many, many little creatures at the bottom, like so:

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11:59am

Thu April 3, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

'Oh, Hello,' Says Andrew, As He Suddenly Grabs You By The Leg Or Neck

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:22 pm

Andrew Ucles YouTube

12:45pm

Tue April 1, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

The List Of Animals Who Can Truly, Really Dance Is Very Short. Who's On It?

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:05 pm

Courtesy of Irena Schulz/ Bird Lovers Only

4:03am

Sat March 22, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

I Can't Believe What I'm Seeing: A Springtime (Froggy) Miracle

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 10:19 am

NOVA scienceNOW

Two weeks ago this animal was frozen solid. If you found one in the woods, packed in the topsoil, hiding under a leaf, you could pull it from the ground and it would feel like an ashtray. You could bang it (lightly) on a table — it would go, "Konk!" like a rock. It doesn't seem to be breathing. It reacts to nothing. It's so dead. Or seems to be. And then, this (I want to call it a miracle) happens ...

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