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7:28am

Sun August 2, 2015
Religion

Mormons Face A Painful Loss If The Church Severs Boy Scout Ties

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 11:44 am

Boy Scouts work on canoes at camp Maple Dell outside Payson, Utah. The Mormon Church is considering pulling out of its 102 year old relationship with the Boy Scouts after the Boy Scouts changed it's policy on allowing gay leaders in the organization.
George Frey Getty Images

The vote by the Boy Scouts of America to lift its ban on openly gay troop leaders last week was a blow to some religious conservative organizations that have long been connected to scouting, especially the Mormon Church, which has deep roots in the Boy Scouts.

The church, also known as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, has used the Boy Scouts as its official program for young men for more than 100 years, according to Quin Monson, a political science professor at Brigham Young University.

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6:21pm

Sat August 1, 2015
Author Interviews

Aviator Beryl Markham Soars Again In 'Paris Wife' Author's New Book

Lydia Thompson NPR

Beryl Markham was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic from East to West. The British-born Kenyan woman was also a racehorse trainer, a writer and a fearless adventurer.

Once famous as an aviation pioneer, she's largely dropped out of the public consciousness. But novelist Paula McClain has put her back in the spotlight — as the protagonist of her new novel, Circling the Sun.

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5:18pm

Sat August 1, 2015
Law

A Lawyer's Advice For Black Men At Traffic Stops: 'Comply Now, Contest Later'

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 5:55 pm

Demonstrators hold up a placard of a man with his hands up during the "Justice For All" march in Washington, DC last December. Numerous protests have brought attention to police violence against people of color. One lawyer, while emphasizing that police are responsible for behaving professionally, also wants to give black men advice on how to survive encounters with police.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

It's been nearly a year since a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed African-American 18-year-old, in Ferguson, Mo. Since then, more deadly police encounters across the country have prompted anger, activism and reform.

Many of those incidents began with traffic stops — routine events that quickly turned deadly. And attorney Eric Broyles says that the risks for citizens are not distributed evenly.

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4:10pm

Sat August 1, 2015
Book News & Features

76 Years Later, Lost F. Scott Fitzgerald Story Sees The Light Of Day

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 5:55 pm

F. Scott Fitzgerald's story "Temperature" — which was found as an unpublished manuscript — appears in the new issue of The Strand Magazine.
AP

Andrew Gulli has an unusual passion: finding unpublished short stories by famous American authors. He searches through libraries and archives, finds works, researches to confirm they've never been published — then publishes them in the literary magazine he edits, The Strand.

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8:06am

Sat August 1, 2015
Performing Arts

For Penn & Teller's Magical Partnership, The Trick Is Telling The Truth

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 3:04 pm

Still snapping selfies, 40 years later.
Joan Marcus Courtesy of Courtesy of Boneau/Bryan-Brown

What does a couple do for its 40th anniversary?

If you're Penn and Teller, you play Broadway. Thirty years after they first played New York, the duo are back with a new show. And it's no quiet celebration, either. In the course of a single performance, they make a cellphone ring inside a dead fish, swallow both needles and fire — and make a rare African spotted pygmy elephant disappear.

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