Kate Archer Kent

News Producer

Kate launched Red River Radio's news division in January 2006. In her one-person shop, she gathers news and perspectives from around the Ark-La-Tex for weekday newscasts that air at 6:06, 6:38, 7:06 and 8:06 a.m.

Previously, she served as director of marketing and public relations for Louisiana Tech University. She also held a similar position at Northeast Iowa Community College. Before entering educational marketing and communications, she was communications coordinator for Regis Corporation in Minneapolis.

Kate has worked for several media outlets. In 2003, she became a contributing reporter and producer for KEDM Public Radio in Monroe, La., and Red River Radio. She was named Reporter of the Year by the Louisiana Associated Press Broadcasters Association in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. She was a Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize finalist for a series on drug addiction.

Kate has also been an assignment desk editor for the Fox affiliate in Minneapolis. Through a fellowship with the International Radio and Television Society, she worked as a feed producer for CBS "Newspath" in New York.

Kate holds a master of journalism degree from Temple University and a B.A. in English and political science from the University of Minnesota. She lives in Shreveport with her husband, Alexandyr, and their two children, Bronwyn and Oliver. In her spare time, Kate enjoys teaching twice-weekly, free community yoga practices at Sadhu Vaswani Hindu Cultural Center in Shreveport.

 

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10:50am

Thu November 1, 2012
Local

Friends of Library group in Marshall showcases rare Bible

Janet Black arranges books at the Weisman-Hirsch House in Marshall, listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Credit Kate Archer Kent

Friends of Library piece

A 239-year-old family Bible will be the only book not for sale at the Friends of Library book sale to benefit the Marshall Public Library. The rare German Bible belongs to historian Gail Beil of Marshall, Texas. She is opening up her 1900 Victorian home for the book sale to be held Nov. 9-11.

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8:58am

Wed October 31, 2012
Local

NSU Scholars' College nurtures liberal arts atmosphere, despite budget cuts

The Scholars' College director T. Davina McClain (left) talks to psychology major Juliette Gray about her senior thesis.
Credit Kate Archer Kent

Twenty-five years after the creation of the Scholars' College at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, freshmen enrollment has almost reached its highest point. Director T. Davina McClain says with a small liberal arts college feel, students find they can get a bargain in a bachelor's degree. She says being unencumbered by debt allows Scholars' College students to pursue more costly graduate programs.

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8:43am

Wed October 31, 2012
Local

Ghost hunters flock to Jefferson, Texas, named a 'spooky getaway'

Ghost stories at

The travel website TripAdvisor has named Jefferson, Texas, to its top 10 list of the nation's spookiest getaways. Historian Jodi Breckenridge leads twice weekly ghost tours through downtown Jefferson. She says the town has embraced its haunted reputation and its special spirits are a tourism draw. Her Halloween tour begins at 8 p.m., near The Jefferson Hotel.

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9:09am

Fri October 26, 2012
Arts

Documentary probes Karnack, Texas, munitions site

Richard Michael Pruitt

Retired Dallas Morning News photographer and Marshall, Texas, native Richard Michael Pruitt presents his documentary, "From Bombs to Birds," on Saturday, Oct. 27, at 6:30 p.m. The 54-minute documentary screens at the Christian Life Center of First United Methodist Church in Marshall. Pruitt spent two years exploring the transformation of thousands of acres of land from the former Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant into the Caddo Lake National Wildlife Refuge.

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1:10pm

Thu October 25, 2012
Local

Refuge turns former munitions site into forest land

Concrete crushing equipment recycles building foundations once part of the Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant in Karnack, Texas. About 7,000 acres has been transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which is returning the land to old growth forest.
Credit Kate Archer Kent

The Caddo Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Karnack, Texas, is midway through a project of busting up 90,000 tons of concrete slab. Building foundations are some of the last remnants that remain of the former Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant. The land is being turned into old growth forest by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Refuge manager Mark Williams says the contractor's biggest customer is the State of Louisiana, which wants all of the fill for the construction of I-49.

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