Kate Archer Kent

News Producer

Kate launched Red River Radio's news division in Jan. 2006. In her one-person shop, she gathers news and perspectives from around the Ark-La-Tex for weekday Morning Edition newscasts that air at 6:04, 6:49, 7:04, 7:49 and 8:04 a.m.

Previously, she served as director of marketing and public relations for Louisiana Tech University. She also held a similar post at Northeast Iowa Community College. Before entering education marketing, she was communications coordinator for global hair salon firm Regis Corp. in Minneapolis.

Kate has worked for several media outlets. In 2003, she became a contributing reporter for KEDM Public Radio in Monroe, La., and Red River Radio. She was named Reporter of the Year by the Louisiana Associated Press Broadcasters Association in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. She was a Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize finalist for a series on drug addiction.

Kate has also been an assignment desk editor for the Fox affiliate in Minneapolis. Through a fellowship with the International Radio and Television Society, she worked as a feed producer for CBS "Newspath" in New York.

Kate holds a master of journalism degree from Temple University and a B.A. in English and political science from the University of Minnesota. She lives in Shreveport with her husband, Alex, and their children, Bronwyn, Oliver, Hugo and Alistair. In her spare time, Kate enjoys leading twice-weekly, free community yoga practices at Sadhu Vaswani Hindu Cultural Center in Shreveport.

 

Ways To Connect

Kate Archer Kent

A federal rule that revises which bodies of water are subject to the Clean Water Act will take effect Aug. 28. Some Louisiana farmers are concerned that the new Clean Water Rule is overreaching.

The biggest change is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is defining ditches, according to LSU Ag Center water policy economist Naveen Adusumilli. Any ditch that is part of a tributary or connected to a previously jurisdictional waterway would now have to be in compliance with the Clean Water Act.

A Pine Tree High School art teacher is recognized by Harvard’s Graduate School of Education and the national education nonprofit Expeditionary Learning.

Three cross-curricular projects of Elizabeth White of Longview were accepted into the Center for Student Work or CSW in July. The CSW is a collection of curated student work where teachers share classroom projects that produced awesome results.

Sarah Fuller

Environmental science research underway at Stephen F. Austin State University is investigating some native trees and shrubs that could provide a natural control for the ammonia waste byproduct emitted from poultry farms.

SFA researchers are evaluating six species of trees: American holly, Arizona cypress, arborvitae, Eastern red cedar, yaupon holly and roughleaf dogwood.

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