Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

Shareholders of Exxon Mobil and Chevron have voted to reject a series of resolutions aimed at encouraging the companies to take stronger actions to battle climate change.

But Exxon Mobil shareholders voted in favor of a rule that could make it easier for minority shareholders to nominate outsiders to the company's board, a potential victory for environmentalists.

Activist shareholders at both companies had placed an unusual number of resolutions on the ballot related to climate change.

Monsanto has rejected a $62 billion takeover bid from Bayer as "incomplete and financially inadequate," but left the door open to further negotiations with the German chemical and pharmaceutical giant.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump has made various statements about his tax plan in recent days that have left some people pretty confused about just what he'd like to do. Here's a guide to interpreting his remarks.

"In other words, it's going to cost me a fortune." — News conference, Sept. 28, 2015

At a news conference at Trump Tower, Trump unveiled a series of proposals to dramatically simplify and cut business and personal taxes.

Donald Trump says he can "make America great again" through his prodigious skills as a dealmaker, using them to reshape trade pacts, prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons and stop illegal immigration.

His infamous effort to acquire control of the Empire State Building from some of New York's most powerful real estate titans in the 1990s shows how aggressive he can be, the kind of people he's willing to do business with and how he can still make money even when he loses.

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