Jeff Brady

Jeff Brady is a NPR National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia. He covers the mid-Atlantic region and the energy industry.

In this role, Brady reports on the business of energy, from concerns over hydraulic fracturing in Western Pennsylvania to the oil boom in North Dakota and solar developments in the desert Southwest. With a focus on the consumer, Brady's reporting addresses how the energy industry intersects consumers' perspective at the gas pump and light switch.

Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has covered just about every major domestic news event in the past decade. Before moving to Philadelphia in July 2011, Brady was based in Denver and covered the west for NPR.

In 2005, Brady was among the NPR reporters who covered the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His reporting on flooded cars left behind after the storm exposed efforts to stall the implementation of a national car titling system. Today, the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System is operational and the Department of Justice estimates it could save car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He has also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter; and commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University).

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4:12pm

Sat July 25, 2015
Around the Nation

As Lightning Strikes Spike, Myth-Busting Often Means Safety

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 8:42 pm

Deaths from lightning strikes are up sharply this year, according to the National Weather Service. Here are some myths about lightning, or avoiding it, and tips on how to actually stay safe.

This story initially aired on July 17, 2015 on Morning Edition.

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4:35am

Fri July 17, 2015
Shots - Health News

'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 9:19 am

You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong.
Marko Korosec Barcroft Media/Landov

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

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3:31pm

Tue July 14, 2015
Law

Obama Proposes Changes To Criminal Justice System

Originally published on Tue July 14, 2015 6:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:30pm

Thu July 2, 2015
Energy

BP To Pay $18.7 Billion In Landmark Settlement Over 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 5:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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3:37pm

Thu June 25, 2015
Law

After Sandusky, A Debate Over Whether Sex-Abuse Law Goes Too Far

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 7:13 pm

The Penn State University campus in State College, Pa. A new state law requires university professors to get a background check every three years and have their fingerprints taken.
Gene J. Puskar AP

University professors in Pennsylvania are upset over a new law that requires them to get a child abuse background check every three years and have their fingerprints taken.

The law was passed after the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal. In 2012 Sandusky, a former Penn State assistant football coach, was convicted of sexually abusing 10 boys over a 15-year period. He'll likely spend the rest of his life in prison.

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