Don Gonyea

Although Don Gonyea is a NPR National Political Correspondent based in Washington, D.C., he spends much of his time traveling throughout the United States covering campaigns, elections, and the political climate throughout the country. His reports can be heard on all NPR programs and at NPR.org.

During the 2000 presidential campaign, Gonyea chronicled the controversial election and the ensuing legal recount battles in the courts. At the same time George W. Bush moved into the White House in 2001, Gonyea started as NPR's White House Correspondent. He was at the White House on the morning of September 11, 2001, providing live reports following the evacuation of the building.

As White House correspondent, Gonyea covered the Bush administration's prosecution of wars in both Afghanistan and Iraq and during the 2004 campaign he traveled with President Bush and Democratic nominee John Kerry. In November 2006, Gonyea co-anchored NPR's coverage of historic elections when Democrats captured control of both houses of the US Congress. In 2008, Gonyea was the lead reporter covering the entire Obama presidential campaign for NPR, from the Iowa caucuses to victory night in Chicago. He was also there when candidate Obama visited the Middle East and Europe. He continued covering the White House and President Barack Obama until spring 2010, when he moved into his current position.

Gonyea has filed stories from around the globe, including Moscow, Beijing, London, Islamabad, Doha, Budapest, Seoul, San Salvador, and Hanoi. He attended President Bush's first ever meeting with Russia's Vladimir Putin in Slovenia in 2001, and subsequent, at times testy meetings between the two leaders in St. Petersburg, Shanghai and Bratislava. He also covered Mr.Obama's first trip overseas as president.

In 1986, Gonyea got his start at NPR reporting from Detroit on labor unions and the automobile industry. He spent countless hours on picket lines and in union halls covering strikes, including numerous lengthy work stoppages at GM in the late 1990s. Gonyea also reported on the development of alternative fuel and hybrid-powered automobiles, Dr. Jack Kevorkian's assisted-suicide crusade, and the 1999 closing of Detroit's classic Tiger Stadium — the ballpark of his youth.

Over the years Gonyea has contributed to PBS's NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, the BBC, CBC, AP Radio, and the Columbia Journalism Review. He periodically teaches college journalism courses.

Gonyea has won numerous national and state awards for his reporting. He was part of the team that earned NPR a 2000 George Foster Peabody Award for the All Things Considered series "Lost & Found Sound."

A native of Monroe, Michigan, Gonyea is an honors graduate of Michigan State University.

Pages

7:14am

Sat August 15, 2015
It's All Politics

'Same Old Partisan Games,' Clinton Says Of Attacks Regarding Emails

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 12:19 pm

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Iowa Democratic Wing Ding on Friday in Clear Lake, Iowa.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidates played to a full house in Clear Lake, Iowa, on Friday night — in the same ballroom where in 1959 Buddy Holly played his last-ever show. At the historic Surf Ballroom, with a vintage mirror ball dangling from the ceiling, candidates offered up a version of their own greatest hits.

In her speech, Hillary Clinton took a new approach, going after those who have been attacking her over her email accounts and over her actions during the 2012 terrorist attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Read more

9:26am

Fri August 14, 2015
It's All Politics

Are There Kernels Of Truth In Latest Iowa Poll? Maybe Not

Originally published on Fri August 14, 2015 2:43 pm

The Federal Election Commission might not approve the methods of WHO-TV's Corn Caucus at the Iowa State Fair. But voting in jars does allow for transparency.
Don Gonyea NPR

There are highly scientific polls, with careful attention paid to sample size and demographics.

There are robopolls where computers make the calls and interview those who pick up the phone.

There are those cable TV polls where viewers are asked to "call this number and tell us who you like."

And then there's the Corn Caucus, sponsored by WHO-TV in Des Moines, every presidential election season at the Iowa State Fair.

Read more

4:24am

Thu August 13, 2015
It's All Politics

Eat, Speak And Stumble: Candidates Visit The Iowa State Fair

Originally published on Thu August 13, 2015 4:05 pm

In 2007, then-candidate Barack Obama rode bumper cars at the Iowa State Fair with his daughter Sasha.
M. Spencer Green AP

You might have heard of the famous butter cow — a life-sized cow made of butter that headlines every Iowa State Fair. But perhaps you didn't know that in 1952, the fair also featured butter sculptures of that year's presidential candidates Dwight D. Eisenhower and Adlai Stevenson.

It's just another example of the symbiotic relationship between politicians and the fair — and it's only gotten deeper over the decades.

Read more

6:47am

Sat August 8, 2015
Politics

Other Candidates Find Ways To Stand Out On Debate Night

Originally published on Sat August 8, 2015 11:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more

4:15am

Fri August 7, 2015
Politics

First Republican Debate Was Wide-Ranging, But All Orbited Around Trump

Originally published on Fri August 7, 2015 3:26 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more

Pages