David Welna

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

When U.S. intelligence agencies spy on Americans, they're supposed to get a warrant. But what happens when they're spying on a foreigner and an American calls up?

The way intelligence agencies handle what they call this "incidental" collection of information — and what political leaders eventually do with it — will be a big part of the next phase in Congress' investigations about the Russian interference in last year's presidential election.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

As we just heard from Scott, North Korea and its drive for nuclear-armed missiles is high on the agenda at this U.S.-China summit. NPR national security correspondent David Welna has more on possible U.S. responses to this threat.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Those hearings on Russian meddling in U.S. election process summon memories of another era and another congressional investigation. NPR's David Welna has the report.

(SOUNDBITE OF GAVEL BANGING)

Pages