Ari Shapiro

Ari Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from five continents. (Sorry, Australia.)

As NPR's International Correspondent based in London, Shapiro travels the world covering a wide range of topics for NPR's national news programs. Starting in September, Shapiro will join Kelly McEvers, Audie Cornish and Robert Siegel as a weekday host of All Things Considered.

Shapiro joined NPR's international desk after four years as White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. In 2012, Shapiro embedded with the presidential campaign of Republican Mitt Romney. He was NPR Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering one of the most tumultuous periods in the Department's history.

Shapiro is a frequent guest analyst on television news programs, and his reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, L'Olympia in Paris, and Mount Lycabettus in Athens.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

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2:42am

Thu July 23, 2015
The Salt

Buddhist Diet For A Clear Mind: Nuns Preserve Art Of Korean Temple Food

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 5:01 pm

Iced tea made from local berries is served with melon and squares of sweet sticky rice topped with fruits and nuts. The nuns eat these sweets on head-shaving day, to replenish their energy.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Detox diets come and go, like any other fad. In South Korea, one popular diet has staying power. It has been around for at least 1,600 years, ever since the founding of the Jinkwansa temple in the mountains outside of Seoul.

This Buddhist monastery sits at the convergence of two streams, amid twisting leafy trees and soaring peaks. It's one of many temples in the countryside outside of South Korea's capital. Each temple has its own specialty. Jinkwansa is famous for two reasons.

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3:57pm

Wed July 22, 2015
Arts & Life

The Story Of South Korea Told Through One Cartoonist

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 5:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:31pm

Thu July 9, 2015
Europe

Belgrade's Ruined Defense Ministry Serves As Reminder Of NATO Airstrikes

Originally published on Thu July 9, 2015 8:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:04am

Fri June 26, 2015
Europe

Kosovo: The Pros And Cons Of Being Europe's Newest Country

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 6:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:51pm

Wed June 24, 2015
Europe

After Kosovo Emerged From War, Foreign Extremists Radicalized Youth

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 7:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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