4:39pm

Sun February 5, 2012
Economy

Stopping The 'Brain Drain' Of The U.S. Economy

Recent surveys show that a large percentage of graduates from the nation's top schools are taking jobs in consulting or financial sector.
Mary Altaffer AP

Yale University student Marina Keegan received an email last May from Bridgewater Associates, one of the world's largest hedge funds, offering her $100 if she said why she didn't apply for a summer internship.

Keegan, an English major, decided to take Bridgewater up on its offer.

"It was only sort of once I was inside the room when I realized ... maybe I'm helping them perfect their recruiting machine, which is exactly what we were doing," Keegan tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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4:00pm

Sun February 5, 2012
Music

New Staging Of 'Yentl' Tells A Transgender Girl's Story

Actress Hillary Clemens portrays Yentl/Anshel in the new staging of Isaac Bashevis Singer's play at the Asolo Repertory Theatre in Sarasota, Fla.
Daniel Perales Studio

Singer-songwriter Jill Sobule is probably best known for her 1995 hit single, "I Kissed a Girl." These days, she's taking on a new musical project: the gender-bending play by Isaac Bashevis Singer, Yentl.

Barbra Streisand turned Singer's play into her 1984 hit movie musical of the same name. Although Sobule's version features music, it's a little more Singer and a little less Streisand.

"She changed the ending and made it kind of Funny Girl coming to America. ... We keep to the word," Sobule tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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2:56pm

Sun February 5, 2012
Health

Fewer Autopsies Mean Crucial Info Goes To The Grave

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 2:52 pm

Colleagues of Renee Royak-Schaler at the University of Maryland School of Medicine paid for and conducted an autopsy that revealed that cancer had ravaged her body. Today, autopsies are conducted on just 5 percent of patients.
Jenna Isaacson Pfueller ProPublica

A half-century ago, autopsies — sometimes called the ultimate medical audit — were an integral part of American health care, performed on roughly half of all patients who died in hospitals. But today, autopsies are conducted on roughly 5 percent of such patients, and experts say that is a troubling trend.

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2:10pm

Sun February 5, 2012
Author Interviews

How Whitey Bulger Corrupted The Justice System

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 12:32 pm

These 1984 file photos originally released by the FBI show New England organized crime figure James "Whitey" Bulger.
Federal Bureau of Investigation, File AP

When Whitey Bulger was captured last year, he'd spent close to 20 years on the run — and on the FBI's Most Wanted list.

Bulger was the head of an Irish gang terrorizing the streets of South Boston. The Massachusetts State Police wanted him gone, but curiously couldn't touch him.

Why? Bulger was a confidential FBI informant, and the bureau shielded him for years.

Robert Fitzpatrick, the author of Betrayal: Whitey Bulger and the FBI Agent Who Fought to Bring Him Down, says Bulger was widely known to be an unsavory character.

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11:09am

Sun February 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Russia's Hottest Protest Song, Courtesy Of Military Elite

A screen grab from the YouTube video, "Putin and the Paratroopers."
YouTube

An Internet hit is becoming the anthem for Russian protesters as they march against Vladimir Putin's rule.

In the few days since it was posted, more than 1 million people have watched the YouTube video for the song, catapulting its band into sudden stardom. Yet this is no ordinary story of the latest Web sensation.

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9:21am

Sun February 5, 2012
Middle East

Egypt To Try 19 Americans Over NGO Funding

Egyptian official media reported Sunday that 40 people, including at least 19 Americans, have been referred to trial on charges they illegally provided foreign funding to non-governmental organizations in the country.

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7:00am

Sun February 5, 2012
Presidential Race

Curtain Rises On Colorado Caucuses

Colorado holds its Republican caucuses on Tuesday. Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Ron Paul have focused their attention there recently. The state will also be a key battleground in the general election contest. From Denver, Kirk Siegler of member station KUNC reports.

7:00am

Sun February 5, 2012
Middle East

Syria Veto 'Outrageous' Says U.N. Envoy Susan Rice

Originally published on Sun February 5, 2012 2:53 pm

United States Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice spoke after the Security Council vote on Saturday, saying the United States was "disgusted" by Russia and China's veto.
Mary Altaffer AP

For nearly a year, Syria's government has sustained a violent crackdown against opposition protesters. The international community has struggled to agree on a unified response, and on Saturday, the latest effort to bring pressure on Syria's leaders fell apart.

Russia and China blocked a U.N. Security Council resolution that would have condemned the Syrian government for attacks against civilians. U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice said the United States was "disgusted" by the double veto.

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7:00am

Sun February 5, 2012
Middle East

Violence Rises In Syria As UN Falters

For nearly a year, Syria's government has sustained a violent crackdown against opposition protesters. The international community has struggled to agree on a unified response, and on Saturday, the latest effort to bring pressure on Syria's leaders fell apart. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Kelly McEvers, who is monitoring developments in Syria.

7:00am

Sun February 5, 2012
Europe

Greece: Partial Agreement Reached With Creditors

The moment of truth has arrived for Greece. Sunday the government must finally reach agreement on the terms of a $170-billion bailout from the so-called troika: the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund. John Psaropoulos reports from Athens.

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