1:58am

Wed February 6, 2013
Puerto Rico: A Disenchanted Island

Puerto Rico's Battered Economy: The Greece Of The Caribbean?

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 9:51 am

Edward Bonet, 23, lives in Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico, and works on the dive team at the Copamarina Beach Resort & Spa in the town of Guanica. He lives with his grandmother, while his mother and sister live in Central Florida.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Puerto Rico's population is declining. Faced with a deteriorating economy, increased poverty and a swelling crime rate, many citizens are fleeing the island for the U.S. mainland. In a four-part series, Morning Edition explores this phenomenon, and how Puerto Rico's troubles are affecting its people and other Americans in unexpected ways.

Edward Bonet's mom no longer tries to convince him to join her in Florida. Unlike his family, the 23-year-old from Puerto Rico refuses to leave the island and its shattered economy.

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1:56am

Wed February 6, 2013
The Salt

New Hampshire Cuts Red Tape To Put Nanobreweries On Tap

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 9:51 am

Throwback Brewery co-owner Nicole Carrier and assistant brewer Chris Naro pour beer for customers at their North Hampton, N.H., taproom.
Emily Corwin NHPR

As beer drinkers demand increasingly obscure beers with ingredients like jalapenos or rhubarb, smaller and smaller breweries are stepping up to the plate. New Hampshire is one state helping these brewery startups get off the ground, with new laws that make it easier for small-scale breweries to obtain licenses and distribute their craft beers.

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1:01am

Wed February 6, 2013
Sweetness And Light

It's The Dog Days For America's Sports Dynasties

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 9:51 am

Maltipoo Shaggy is dressed as a Yankees fan at the Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade in New York City last year. Commentator Frank Deford says the Yankees are turning into a home for the assisted living.
John Moore Getty Images

Since that devilish little morality saga with Linda Evans and Joan Collins left television in 1989, there have been no dynasties in our world outside of sports.

Today, nobody says that William and Kate are continuing a dynasty or the Kennedys are a dynasty, or the Rockefellers, or even that dreadful ugly chubby family in North Korea.

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9:00pm

Tue February 5, 2013
Newport Jazz

Newport Jazz Festival: Bill Frisell Live

Airs Tuesday, February 5 at 9 p.m.  Bill Frisell is a soft-spoken guy who does a lot of talking with his guitar — and its pedals and effects. So perhaps it's appropriate that he recently issued an album called All We Are Saying, a collection of John Lennon songs. Though he's known primarily for working with other improvisers, he's of the Baby Boomer generation, and he doesn't hide his love for Beatles songs away. With a band including steel guitarist Greg Leisz, violinist Jenny Scheinman, bassist Tony Scherr, and drummer Kenny Wollesen, Frisell doesn't reinvent the wheel — but he certainly gives it a new spin.

Set List:    "Across The Universe"    "Beautiful Boy"    "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away"    "#9 Dream"    "Come Together"    "In My Life"    "Strawberry Fields Forever" This concert is made possible by NPR Music and was recorded at the 2012 Newport Jazz Festival.

5:36pm

Tue February 5, 2013
Business

S&P Lawsuit Puts Ratings Firms Back In The Spotlight

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 6:17 pm

In a lawsuit, the Justice Department alleges Standard and Poor's misled investors with fraudulent credit ratings. The agency could seek more than $5 billion in damages.
Henny Ray Abrams AP

The Justice Department said Tuesday it could seek more than $5 billion in damages from Standard & Poor's, the nation's biggest credit ratings company, a day after it sued the company, alleging that S&P defrauded investors by giving triple-A ratings to risky subprime mortgage investments.

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5:15pm

Tue February 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Survey: Republicans In Congress Own More Guns Than Democrats

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, of Alaska, told USA Today she owned a dozen guns.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

In Washington, everything seems to break down along partisan lines. Gun ownership is no exception.

USA Today surveyed every congressional office to ask whether its lawmaker owned a gun.

The results?

-- "One hundred nineteen Republicans and 46 Democrats declared themselves as gun owners..."

And:

-- "Only 10% of Republicans who responded said they do not own a gun, while 66% of Democrats said they are not gun owners."

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5:02pm

Tue February 5, 2013
Europe

Bulgaria Links Hezbollah To Deadly Attack On Israelis

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 7:51 am

Bulgarian authorities say they have evidence the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah financed and carried out a bomb attack at a Black Sea resort town last year, killing five Israeli tourists and one Bulgarian citizen.

Bulgarian Foreign Minister Nikolay Mladenov said it was an extremely intensive investigation.

"The results of that investigation leads to a number of persons who are connected to the military wing of Hezbollah," he said.

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5:02pm

Tue February 5, 2013
It's All Politics

Viral Story About Free Wi-Fi Spotlights Mostly Hidden Policy War

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 11:48 am

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski last year warned of a "war on Wi-Fi."
Jacquelyn Martin AP

(Revised on 2/6/1013 at 12:28 pm ET to include FCC comment.)

In Washington, there's always one kind of alleged war or another against some group or idea — the war on women, the war on religion and the war on the Second Amendment come quickly to mind.

This week, many of us became aware of another supposed conflict we had never heard of: essentially, a war on Wi-Fi.

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4:33pm

Tue February 5, 2013
Middle East

For The First Time In Decades, Iran's President Visits Egypt

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 5:36 pm

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad visits an Islamic shrine Tuesday in Cairo. He became the first Iranian leader to visit Egypt since the 1970s.
Amr Nabil AP

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad on Tuesday became the first Iranian leader to visit Egypt since the 1970s, the latest sign of the thawing of relations between the rival Muslim nations.

Ahmadinejad received a red-carpet welcome as Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi greeted him on the tarmac at Cairo International Airport with a kiss on each cheek.

Under Egypt's former leader, Hosni Mubarak, a visit like this would never have happened.

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3:59pm

Tue February 5, 2013
Shots - Health News

Aggressive Care Still Common For Dying Seniors, Despite Hospice Uptick

Joe Takach comforts his friend Lillian Landry, as she spends her last days in the hospice wing of a hospital in Oakland Park, Fla., in 2009.
J. Pat Carter AP

Although federal data show that fewer Medicare beneficiaries are dying in hospitals that doesn't mean they're getting a lot less medical care in their final days, new research suggests.

Even as deaths in acute-care hospitals declined between 2000 and 2009, the use of intensive care units in the final 30 days of life increased, as did short-term hospice use. The rate of changes to care for these patients, such as transfers within the last three days of life, also increased.

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