5:23pm

Wed February 20, 2013
Shots - Health News

Print Me An Ear: 3-D Printing Tackles Human Cartilage

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 6:34 am

Larry Bonassar shows off an ear that he and his colleagues at Cornell University built out of living cartilage cells with the help of a 3-D printer.
Lindsay France Cornell University Photography

An ear, unsurprisingly, is difficult to make from scratch. Ear cartilage is uniquely flexible and strong and has been impossible for scientists to reproduce with synthetic prostheses.

If a child is born without one, doctors typically carve a replacement ear out of rib cartilage, but it lacks the wonderfully firm yet springy qualities of the original ear. And it often doesn't look so good.

So why not print one?

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5:16pm

Wed February 20, 2013
Shots - Health News

In Reversal, Florida Gov. Scott Agrees To Medicaid Expansion

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 6:25 am

Florida Gov. Rick Scott, long a foe of the administration's health overhaul, reversed course and agree to accept federal funds to expand Medicaid in the state.
J Pat Carter AP

Perhaps Florida Gov. Rick Scott's motto should be "never say never."

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4:46pm

Wed February 20, 2013
The Two-Way

Cool Photo: A Black Spot, The Size Of Six Earths, Appears On The Sun

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 8:42 pm

The bottom two black spots on the sun, known as sunspots, appeared quickly over the course of Feb. 19-20, 2013.
NASA/SDO/AIA/HMI/Goddard Space Flight Center

Over the course of two days in February, scientists watched something amazing happening on the surface of our sun: A giant black spot grew to over six Earths in diameter.

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center released a picture of the sun, which shows the spots in deep black.

NASA explains that it's hard to know the full extent of the spots, because it's on a sphere "not a flat disk." NASA adds:

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4:33pm

Wed February 20, 2013
Middle East

A West Bank Story, Told Through Palestinian Eyes

Originally published on Sun February 24, 2013 7:49 am

Emad Burnat, a Palestinian who co-directed the Oscar-nominated documentary 5 Broken Cameras, displays the cameras destroyed by Israeli settlers and security forces. The film focuses on a Palestinian village protesting Israel's separation barrier in the West Bank.
Kino Lorbor Inc. AP

The Academy Award-nominated documentary 5 Broken Cameras tells the story of Bil'in, a modest Palestinian village perilously close to an Israeli settlement in the West Bank.

After the Israeli government began putting up its West Bank separation barrier, Bil'in resident Emad Burnat picked up a video camera, and in 2005 began a multiyear documentary project.

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4:15pm

Wed February 20, 2013
The Salt

Smaller But Better? Organic Tomatoes May Pack More Nutritional Punch

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 1:05 pm

A new study published in the journal PLOS ONE finds that tomatoes grown on organic farms were about 40 percent smaller than conventionally grown tomatoes. The upside? They pack more of a nutritional punch. The researchers found the organic tomatoes had significantly higher levels of vitamin C, sugar and lycopene.

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4:12pm

Wed February 20, 2013
Media

New York Times Plans To Sell 'Boston Globe'

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 5:11 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

The Grey Lady is shedding more of its assets. This afternoon, The New York Times Company announced that it intends to sell The Boston Globe and other properties it owns in New England.

For more on this, NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik joins me from our bureau in New York. And, David, what can you tell us? Why this sale, and why now?

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3:47pm

Wed February 20, 2013
It's All Politics

Republicans Make 'Benghazi' A Frequent Refrain

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 5:02 pm

Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., confer at the start of a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing last week on the appointments of military leaders. McCain and Graham have been among the Republicans pushing the Obama administration for answers about the Benghazi attack.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The White House hopes the Senate will confirm Chuck Hagel next week as defense secretary.

Republicans delayed the vote for the same reason they scuttled Susan Rice's bid to be secretary of state: Benghazi.

The attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, last September killed four Americans, including the ambassador to Libya. And Benghazi has since become a rallying cry for Republicans.

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3:41pm

Wed February 20, 2013
Business

For The Publicly Traded, Going Private Can Be Risky Business

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 5:11 pm

Dell's founder and another tech company have announced plans to take the computer giant private. While companies can benefit from withdrawing from the stock market, there are potential pitfalls as well.
Paul Sakuma AP

It's been a busy month for corporate America.

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3:20pm

Wed February 20, 2013
Book Reviews

'The Dinner' Offers Food For Thought

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 5:11 pm

iStockphoto.com

Food doesn't matter much in novels. Years will pass in a person's life without a single description of a snack. Not a moment between adverbs for a taco. No wonder so many characters in contemporary fiction are glum: They're not hopeless; they're hungry.

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3:11pm

Wed February 20, 2013
The Two-Way

Lance Armstrong Will Not Cooperate With USADA Doping Probe

Lance Armstrong, during the interview with Oprah Winfrey that was recorded Monday and began airing Thursday night.
George Burns/Oprah Winfrey Network Getty Images

Lance Armstrong will not cooperate with a United States Anti-Doping Agency probe into doping in the cycling world.

Bloomberg reports Armstrong missed a deadline set by USADA today. Armstrong's lawyer said he would not cooperate because the probe was too narrow.

Bloomberg adds:

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