12:50pm

Tue March 19, 2013
The Two-Way

Malala, Pakistani Teen Shot For Demanding An Education, Heads To School In U.K.

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:53 pm

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban, attends her first day of school on Tuesday just weeks after being released from the hospital.
Malala Press Office AP

Some terrific news today: Malala Yousafzai's story has come full circle. If you remember, the Pakistani teenager was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman because she was in favor of girls receiving an education.

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12:33pm

Tue March 19, 2013
The Two-Way

Flush With Oil, Abu Dhabi Opens World's Largest Solar Plant

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 1:34 pm

Rows of parabolic mirrors at the Shams 1 plant in Abu Dhabi.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Abu Dhabi, the most oil-rich of the United Arab Emirates, is now home to the world's single-largest concentrated solar power plant.

The 100-megawatt Shams 1 plant cost an estimated $750 million and is expected to provide electricity to 20,000 homes, according to the BBC.

Why, you might ask?

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12:20pm

Tue March 19, 2013
World Cafe

Billy Bragg On World Cafe

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 7:14 pm

Billy Bragg.
Courtesy of the artist

With a career spanning more than 30 years, English musician Billy Bragg blends folk, rock and punk with messages about politics and love. His new album Tooth & Nail is his first release in five years.

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12:20pm

Tue March 19, 2013
The Salt

How Master Chefs Keep France's Brightest Culinary Flames Alive

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:08 pm

Serge Devesa, executive chef at New York's InterContinental Barclay Hotel, prepares bouillabaisse, a specialty from his hometown of Marseille, France. Devesa was just named a master chef by the Maître Cuisiniers de France.
Courtesy of InterContinental Barclay

On the television show MasterChef, amateur chefs compete for a title and go on to open their own restaurants, or ink TV deals. That's the Hollywood version of the master chef, anyway.

But to earn the title in France, chefs must be inducted into the prestigious — and very exclusive — society called Maître Cuisiniers de France. It's more than 60-years-old, and it's one of the highest honors in the country.

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12:17pm

Tue March 19, 2013
Music Reviews

Justin Timberlake Returns To Music With Enthusiasm And 'Experience'

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 9:03 am

The 20/20 Experience is Justin Timberlake's first album since 2006.
Tom Monro RCA

The orchestral swirls, the transition to a soul-man groove, the falsetto croon — there you have some of the key elements to Justin Timberlake's album The 20/20 Experience. The title implies a certain clarity of vision, even as any given song presents the singer as a starry-eyed romantic, bedazzled by a woman upon whom he cannot heap enough compliments, come-ons and seductive playfulness.

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12:00pm

Tue March 19, 2013
U.S.

An 'Absolute Will To Forget': Iraq Casts Shorter Shadow Than Vietnam

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 1:30 pm

A soldier in the last American military convoy to depart Iraq, from the 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, waves after crossing over the border into Kuwait on Dec. 18, 2011.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Sometimes the whole country wants to forget.

Tuesday marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the war in Iraq. The last U.S. troops didn't leave that country until the end of 2011.

But Iraq, which dominated much of the nation's political discourse over the past decade, already seems largely forgotten.

"The Iraq War casts a shadow, but not a very large one," says Richard Kohn, a military historian at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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11:50am

Tue March 19, 2013
The Two-Way

House Across From Westboro Baptist Is Painted With Gay Pride Rainbow Colors

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 2:41 pm

Planting Peace is painting the house across from the Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka with the colors of the gay pride rainbow.
Courtesy of Carol Hartsell Huffington Post

Aaron Jackson took inspiration from a 9-year-old kid who stood up to Westboro Baptist Church protesters.

As Mark wrote last year, Josef Miles stood in front of protesters carrying signs that read "God Hates [Gays]" with his own sign that read "God Hates No One."

Today, Jackson is following through on a project that started about six months ago when he decided to buy a house across the street from the infamous church in Topeka, Kan.

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11:41am

Tue March 19, 2013
It's All Politics

Rand Paul Reaffirms Support For Path To Citizenship

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 1:02 pm

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks Tuesday to the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky doubled down Tuesday on a previous call for a path to citizenship, telling a major Hispanic business group that his message to the nation's illegal immigrants is: "If you wish to live and work in America, then we will find a place for you."

Conservatives, he told the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, must "become part of the solution" to immigration, including dealing with the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants now living in the U.S. In his Washington speech, Paul said:

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11:39am

Tue March 19, 2013
Shots - Health News

Sorting Out The Mammogram Debate: Who Should Get Screened When?

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 3:21 pm

A woman gets a mammogram in Putanges, France.
Mychele Daniau AFP/Getty Images

Mammography outcomes from nearly a million U.S. women suggest which ones under 50 would stand the greatest chance of benefiting from regular screening: those with very dense breasts.

That's been a bone of contention ever since a federal task force declared nearly four years ago that women younger than 50 shouldn't routinely get the test.

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11:02am

Tue March 19, 2013
The Two-Way

Has The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Been Downgraded?

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 8:18 am

With President Clinton presiding, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left) and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat signed an interim peace accord at the White House in 1993. Twenty years later, President Obama is heading to the region with peace efforts in the deep freeze.
Ron Edmonds AP

Every American president since Harry Truman has wrestled with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, to no avail. Yet they keep trying based on the notion that the Middle East will never be calm until there's peace between these protagonists.

But as President Obama heads to Israel and the West Bank, expectations could hardly be lower. What's more, this long-standing feud, often seen as the holy grail of American diplomacy, no longer seems to hold the same urgency, according to many analysts.

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