4:21pm

Mon April 8, 2013
Business

One Manufacturing Giant Creates Winners And Losers

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:59 pm

Electrolux's new plant in Memphis, Tenn., is the Swedish appliance company's most modern and high-tech facility. The factory will open this summer while an Electrolux plant in Quebec, Canada, is being shuttered.
Andrea Hsu NPR

The United States lost close to 6 million manufacturing jobs between 2000 and 2009. Now, slowly, some of those jobs are coming back. Over the past three years, the U.S. economy has gained a half-million manufacturing jobs.

But even with the manufacturing recovery, there are both winners and losers — and sometimes they're created by the same company.

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4:21pm

Mon April 8, 2013
Shots - Health News

Would Angry Teens Chill Out If They Saw More Happy Faces?

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:59 pm

Researchers say that aggressive people tend to interpret ambiguous faces as reflecting hostility.
iStockphoto.com

All day long we're surrounded by faces. We see them on the subway sitting two by two, pass them on the sidewalk as we make our way to work, then nod to them in the elevator.

But most of those faces don't tell us much about the emotional life of the person behind the face.

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3:51pm

Mon April 8, 2013
The Two-Way

U.S. Will Deploy Solid-Sate Laser Weapon On Ship Headed To Persian Gulf

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 5:54 pm

The Laser Weapon System (LaWS) temporarily installed aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey in San Diego, Calif.
John F. Williams U.S. Navy

For the first time ever, the United States is deploying a solid-state laser weapon. The Laser Weapon System (LaWS) successfully destroyed a drone in flight during a test run and will head to the Persian Gulf aboard the USS Ponce as part of what the military is calling an "at-sea demonstration."

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3:41pm

Mon April 8, 2013
The Two-Way

Climate Change Could Equal Teeth-Rattling Flights

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 5:23 pm

Fly the bumpier skies?
AFP/Getty Images

Buckle up — climate change could make this a bumpy flight.

That's according to a newly published study by two British scientists who say increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere will make "clear air turbulence" — which can't be easily spotted by pilots or satellites — more common over the North Atlantic. That means the potential for gut-wrenching flights between the U.S., Europe and points east.

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3:31pm

Mon April 8, 2013
World Cafe

Next: Luella And The Sun

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 3:58 pm

Luella and the Sun.
Courtesy of the artist

For our Sense of Place: Nashville week, we just had to showcase Luella and the Sun, which has made major fans out of Grimey's Records' Doyle Davis, other bands like Moon Taxi and NPR Music's Ann Powers.

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3:20pm

Mon April 8, 2013
World Cafe

Leagues On World Cafe

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Leagues.
Courtesy of the artist

Today's guest, Leagues, provides a perfect start to World Cafe's week-long visit to Nashville, because it perfectly encapsulates the change going on there. A new rock band, Leagues was formed by an amazing singer, Thad Cockrell, who'd been so disenchanted with his alt-country career that he was ready to leave the music business altogether.

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2:55pm

Mon April 8, 2013
Around the Nation

Struggling W.Va. Town Hopes Boy Scout Camp Brings New Life

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:59 pm

Mount Hope, W.Va., population 1,400, was once a thriving coal town. Today, many of the storefronts in its tiny downtown sit empty.
Noah Adams NPR

Picture a tiny town set along a creek in West Virginia. A mountain rises from the town's eastern edge, overlooking the 1,400 people living below. Then, July comes — and 50,000 people arrive on that mountain for the National Scout Jamboree.

The town is called Mount Hope. I've heard some call it "Mount Hopeless." The town went through the long, downward slump from the boom days of deep-mine coal, when it was a grand, small-town capital of coal mining.

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2:47pm

Mon April 8, 2013
The Two-Way

Webster Celebrates College Chess Title, As New Hire Pays Off

Webster University chess coach Susan Polgar, second from left, won two national titles at Texas Tech. When Webster hired Polgar last year, the entire Tech team followed her to St. Louis.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

If there's no such thing as bad publicity, how much is good publicity worth? Webster University wants to find out.

Last year, the university didn't have a chess team. On Sunday, its team took home the national college championship, the President's Cup, after winning what is often called the "Final Four" of chess.

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2:23pm

Mon April 8, 2013
The Two-Way

After Tumultuous Three Years, Seattle Police Chief John Diaz Will Step Down

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 2:32 pm

Seattle Police Chief John Diaz in 2009.
Ted S. Warren AP

With his department under the watch of the federal government, Seattle Police Chief John Diaz announced today he was stepping down.

The Seattle Times reports:

"Diaz, who has been with the Seattle Police Department for more than 30 years, didn't say why he decided to retire now.

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2:20pm

Mon April 8, 2013
World

A Close-Up Of Syria's Alawites, Loyalists Of A Troubled Regime

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:59 pm

Director Nidal Hassan spent a year filming in Tartous, a Syrian beach town made up mostly of Alawites who still support embattled President Bashar Assad.
Khaled Al-Hariri Reuters/Landov

The film on Syria's Alawite community isn't finished yet, but filmmaker Nidal Hassan's favorite scenes are beginning to take shape.

It opens with fireworks on New Year's Eve in Tartous, Syria. "May God preserve the president for us," one young man yells in a reference to Syrian leader Bashar Assad.

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