3:26am

Mon January 14, 2013
NPR Story

Beijing's 'Airpocalypse' Spurs Pollution Controls, Public Pressure

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 3:39 pm

A woman helps adjust a mask for her friend outside an amusement park on a hazy day in Beijing on Saturday.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

In China's capital, they're calling it the "airpocalypse," with air pollution that's literally off the charts. The air has been classified as hazardous to human health for a fifth consecutive day, at its worst hitting pollution levels 25 times that considered safe in the U.S. The entire city is blanketed in a thick grey smog that smells of coal and stings the eyes, leading to official warnings to stay inside.

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2:24am

Mon January 14, 2013
It's All Politics

Critics Decry Looser Rules For Inauguration Fundraising

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 2:27 pm

Construction was under way on Capitol Hill in November for President Obama's Inauguration Day ceremonies.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

A week from Monday, President Obama is to take his public oath of office for a second term.

The inauguration will be marked by celebratory balls and other festivities, sponsored by the privately financed Presidential Inaugural Committee. The first Obama inauguration had strict fundraising rules. But this year, the rules have been loosened, and critics wonder what happened to the president's old pledge to change the way Washington works.

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2:23am

Mon January 14, 2013
It's All Politics

Lack Of Up-To-Date Research Complicates Gun Debate

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 2:27 pm

Former Rep. Todd Tiahrt, shown in Kansas in 2011, added language to the Justice Department's annual spending bill in 2003 that has put limits on the sharing of government gun records.
John Hanna AP

Vice President Joe Biden is getting ready to make recommendations on how to reduce gun violence in the wake of the school shooting in Newtown, Conn.

But he says his task force is facing an unexpected obstacle: slim or outdated research on weapons.

Public health research dried up more than a decade ago after Congress restricted the use of some federal money to pay for those studies.

A Researcher Under Fire

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2:22am

Mon January 14, 2013
Around the Nation

Better Bring Your Own: University Of Vermont Bans Bottled Water

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 2:27 pm

A student walks past a sculpture made of empty water bottles on the University of Vermont campus. UVM has banned the sale of bottled water.
Toby Talbot AP

When students at the University of Vermont resume classes on the snow-covered Burlington campus Monday, something will be missing: bottled water. UVM is the latest university to ban on-campus sales of bottled water.

At one of UVM's recently retrofitted refill stations, students fill up their reusable bottles with tap water. For many of the 14,000 students and staff on this campus, topping off their refillable bottles is an old habit.

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2:21am

Mon January 14, 2013
The Salt

Young Adults Swapping Soda for The Super Buzz of Coffee

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 2:27 pm

Students are drinking more coffee to stay awake.
iStockphoto.com

If you live in a college town, you might have noticed that campus coffee shops are still buzzing late into the evening.

And that makes sense. New survey data from the NPD group, which tracks trends in what Americans eat and drink, finds that 18- to 24-year-olds are turning to coffee, rather than caffeinated sodas, as their pick-me-up of choice.

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2:20am

Mon January 14, 2013
The Salt

Cross-Culture Cilantro Sauce And Other Secrets Of Gran Cocina Latina

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 2:27 pm

Presilla's Ecuadorian Spicy Onion and Tamarillo Salsa, made right in David Greene's kitchen.
Selena Simmons-Duffin NPR

Chef and culinary historian Maricel Presilla owns two restaurants and has written many cookbooks. But her newest book, Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America, is her attempt to give fans a heaping helping of the many cultures she blends into her world.

"It's my whole life," she tells Morning Edition host David Greene. "There are recipes there of my childhood, things that I remember my family, my aunts doing. But also things that I learned as I started to travel Latin America."

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2:18am

Mon January 14, 2013
Shots - Health News

As Hepatitis C Sneaks Up On Baby Boomers, Treatment Options Grow

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 2:27 pm

Hepatitis C patient Nancy Turner shows Kathleen Coleman, a nurse practitioner, where a forearm rash, a side effect of her treatment, has healed. Turner is one of many patients with hepatitis C experimenting with new drugs to beat back the virus.
Richard Knox NPR

A smoldering epidemic already affects an estimated 4 million Americans, most of whom don't know it.

It's hepatitis C, an insidious virus that can hide in the body for two or three decades without causing symptoms — and then wreak havoc with the liver, scarring it so extensively that it can fail. Half of all people waiting for liver transplants have hepatitis C.

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6:00pm

Sun January 13, 2013
America Abroad

America Abroad: Islamism in Africa

Airs Sunday, January 13 at 6:00 p.m. The assault on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya shocked the American public. African extremist groups like Ansar Dine, Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, and Boko Haram threaten to further destabilize a fragile continent. America Abroad will take listeners to Mali, Nigeria, and Kenya's Swahili Coast to learn about these groups, the threat they present, and how African countries are-or aren't-combating them.

4:45pm

Sun January 13, 2013
National Security

Uncertainty Looms For Pentagon In Obama's Second Term

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 6:25 pm

America's military future is decidedly undecided.

Looming sequestration cuts of massive proportions, coupled with a U.S. troop drawdown in Afghanistan are adding to the boiling partisanship over nominating Chuck Hegel as defense secretary. It's hard to avoid the conclusion that some of the biggest challenges for the Department of Defense come from inside U.S. borders.

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4:12pm

Sun January 13, 2013
NPR Story

Sounds From Space, Recorded By An Astronaut

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 6:25 pm

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield arrived at the International Space Station late last month. He has kept busy updating his Twitter followers about life in space. For those on Earth wondering what space sounds like, Hadfield has recorded the sounds of everyday life aboard the ISS, including a toilet flushing.

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