1:58pm

Mon February 18, 2013
Europe

Greece's Economic Crisis Reveals Fault Lines In The Media

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 6:05 pm

People read newspaper headlines in Athens. In 2009, there were 39 national dailies, 23 national Sunday papers, 14 national weekly papers and dozens of TV and radio stations for a population of 11 million.
Louisa Gouliamaki AFP/Getty Images

Three years of spiraling economic crisis in Greece have devastated every sector of the economy. The Greek media are among the hardest hit. Many newspapers and TV outlets have closed or are on the verge, and some 4,000 journalists have lost their jobs.

Many people believe the country's news media have failed to cover the crisis — and lost credibility along the way. And many Greek journalists acknowledge that a massive conflict of interest sooner or later had to explode.

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1:50pm

Mon February 18, 2013
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond

Disabled Residents Displaced By Superstorm Sandy Back At Home

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 4:01 pm

Jagdesh Trivedi believes his green card and Social Security card were stolen, along with more than $200 and two pairs of shoes.
Fred Mogul WNYC

When Superstorm Sandy crashed ashore in October, thousands of residents of nursing homes, assisted living centers and adult homes evacuated to various facilities, many of them overcrowded and ill-prepared for the influx.

The evacuees have slowly trickled back to those homes that can be repaired.

One group recently returned to an adult home for the mentally ill and physically disabled in Queens, but many residents weren't happy with what awaited them.

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12:20pm

Mon February 18, 2013
Book Reviews

Under Ogawa's Macabre, Metafictional Spell

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 6:23 pm

iStockphoto.com

It used to be a truism among critics of British poetry that Keats and most of his fellow Romantic poets worked in the shadow of John Milton. I'm not making a perfect analogy when I suggest that most contemporary Japanese writers seem to be working under the shadow of Haruki Murakami, but I hope it highlights the spirit of the situation.

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11:53am

Mon February 18, 2013
Poetry

Inaugural Poet Richard Blanco: 'I Finally Felt Like I Was Home'

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 10:03 pm

Richard Blanco reads his poem "One Today" during President Obama's second inaugural, on Jan. 21.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

"I just got the phone call one day," is how poet Richard Blanco describes to Fresh Air's Terry Gross how he learned he had been selected to write and read the inaugural poem for President Obama's second swearing-in on Jan. 21.

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11:00am

Mon February 18, 2013
Pittsburgh Symphony

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

Eroica Trio

Airs Monday, February 18 at 11 a.m.  Manfred Honeck leads the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in the second concert of the season opening with Beethoven’s Overture to The Consecration of the House. Then the Eroica Trio takes the stage for a performance of Beethoven’s Concerto in C Major for Piano, Violin, Cello and Orchestra, the “Triple Concerto.”  This all Beethoven concert concludes with the Symphony No. 3.

10:19am

Mon February 18, 2013
World Cafe

Next: Pickwick

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 7:35 am

Pickwick.
Kyle Johnson Courtesy of the artist

Formed in 2008, Pickwick members Galen Disston, Michael and Garrett Parker, Cassady Lillstrom, Alex Westcoat, and Kory Kruckenberg forged a path toward neo-soul and in 2011 released a compilation of music from three of their EPs. The result was Myths, released one single at a time on 7" vinyl, which put the band on the map and became one of the most popular albums of the year in Seattle.

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9:03am

Mon February 18, 2013
The Salt

Fake Food George Washington Could've Sunk His Fake Teeth Into

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 2:02 pm

Stargazy Pie, a cornish dish named for the way the fish heads poke through the crust towards the sky.
Courtesy of Sandy Levins

If you want to see what George Washington might have munched on, then Sandy Levins is your gal. All the foods she whips up look scrumptious, but if you sneak a bite, you'll get a mouthful of plaster or clay.

Levins is one of a handful of frequently overlooked artisans who craft the replica meals you see in the kitchens and dining rooms of historic houses and museums. Adding faux food to a historical site can help visitors connect to the past, she tells The Salt.

"It's something everyone immediately identifies with, because everyone eats," she says.

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7:02am

Mon February 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Amazon Fires German Security Firm After Claims Of Intimidation

Books in an Amazon warehouse in Bad Hersfeld, Germany.
Jens-Ulrich Koch AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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6:34am

Mon February 18, 2013
Around the Nation

Maker's Mark Really Misses The Mark

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renée Montagne. The makers of Maker's Mark really missed the mark when they went public with a plan to water down the very popular bourbon. Last week, Maker's Mark announced it was going from 90 proof to 84 proof, to stretch supplies in the face of a steep rise in global demand. Loyal customers did not dilute their anger on Twitter. And after a rocky few days, the brand reversed itself yesterday. Cheers. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:27am

Mon February 18, 2013
Around the Nation

Obama Plays Golf With Tiger Woods

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

President Obama is spending the holiday at a private golf resort in Florida. Yesterday, he played 27 holes with Tiger Woods. Reporters were not allowed to watch. The White House Correspondents Association expressed extreme frustration. The White House says this is consistent with other golf outings; something the White House Press Corps can discuss at the Holiday Inn, eight miles away.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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