3:34pm

Wed January 28, 2015
Middle East

Jordan Considers Handing Over Prisoner For Hostage Pilot

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 4:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:29pm

Wed January 28, 2015
Education

At 100, Dartmouth Grad Still Writing His Class Notes

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:28pm

Wed January 28, 2015

3:25pm

Wed January 28, 2015
U.S.

End Of Life Care Can Be Different For Veterans

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:25pm

Wed January 28, 2015
Around the Nation

Deal May Be In Sight For Pacific Coast Longshoremen

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

2:51pm

Wed January 28, 2015
Parallels

Where Is All That Excess Oil Going?

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 4:28 pm

Tankers are berthed beside the Fawley oil refinery on Jan. 7, in Southampton, England. With low oil prices, some traders are buying oil and storing it in tankers, hoping the price will rise soon so they can sell it at a profit.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

There's a term traders use when the price of a commodity like oil has fallen because of oversupply but seems guaranteed to rise again.

It's a market that's "in contango," says Brenda Shaffer, an energy specialist at Georgetown University. "It almost sounds like a sort of great oil dance or something."

And Shaffer says that some oil speculators see an oil market that is in contango in a major way.

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2:37pm

Wed January 28, 2015
The Two-Way

Live, From Iceland: It's A Hamburger

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 3:29 pm

An exhibit called "The last McDonald's hamburger in Iceland" now has a webcam devoted to it. The burger was purchased in 2009.
Bus Hostel Reykjavik

They call it "The last McDonald's hamburger in Iceland." Purchased more than five years ago, it has been displayed in the Na­tional Mu­seum of Ice­land. Now a webcam has been devoted to the hamburger (with a side of fries), among the last sold by the American company in the country.

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1:49pm

Wed January 28, 2015
The Two-Way

A Saint With A Mixed History: Junipero Serra's Canonization Raises Eyebrows

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 3:35 pm

The name Junípero Serra is well known in California: Schools and streets are named in his honor, and statues of the 18th century Spanish missionary still stand. But Native American activists are far less enamored with the friar, saying Serra was actually an accomplice in the brutal colonization of natives. They object to Pope Francis' recent announcement that he will canonize Serra when he travels to the U.S. this fall.

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1:43pm

Wed January 28, 2015
Goats and Soda

India Grows, Russia Shrinks: Mapping Countries By Population

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 3:32 pm

Can you find Australia and Canada? The cartogram, made by Reddit user TeaDranks, scales each country's geographic area by its population. (Click through to see the high-resolution map.)
TeaDranks via Imgur

World maps distort. It's inherent in their design.

Take a spherical object (the Earth) and try to represent it on a flat plane (paper). Some parts of the sphere are going to get distorted. (On most maps, Canada and Russia get puffed up, while countries along the equator get shrunk.)

Every now and then, though, you stumble across a map that enlightens.

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1:42pm

Wed January 28, 2015
Shots - Health News

Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-Prone And Should Protect Their Brains

Dr. Frances Jensen is a professor and chair of the Department of Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.
Courtesy of Harper Collins

Teens can't control impulses and make rapid smart decisions like adults can — but why?

Research into how the human brain develops helps explain. In a teenager, the frontal lobe of the brain, which controls decision-making, is built, but not fully insulated — so signals move slowly.

"Teenagers are not as readily able to access their frontal lobe to say, 'Oh, I better not do this,' " Dr. Frances Jensen tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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